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Public Drinking Water Supply Results

Public Drinking Water Results

Public Drinking Water Monitoring Results Donegal January to July 2015

Public Drinking Water Supply Results 2014‌‌

Public Drinking Water Supply Results 2013

Public Drinking Water Supply Results 2012

Public Drinking Water Supply Results 2011

How drinking water quality is determined

What's in your water?

 

Alerts and Exceedances

Notification of Exceedences to EPA

Donegal County Council - EPA Directions Update - November2013

Ballyshannon EPA Action Programme Approval Response - 310811

Ballyshannon EPA Direction PAE 2009-96 - 240311

Cashelard EPA Action Programme Approval - 310811

Cashelard EPA Direction 10(4) - 230311

Fintown EPA Action Programme Approval Response - 310811

Fintown EPA Direction 10(4) - 230311

Letterkenny EPA Action Programme Approval Response - 310811

Letterkenny EPA Direction - 10(4) - 230311

 

EPA Reports

Drinking Water Report 2010 for Donegal and the EPA Drinking Water Report 2010

Donegal Remedial Action List - September 2012

Pettigo Audit Report - March 2012

Parkhill, Ballyshannon Audit Report - February 2012

 

Protect Your Drinking Water

Protecting Drinking Water from Pesticides - General Information

Protecting Drinking Water from Pesticides - Advice for Farmers and Other Profess

Protecting Drinking Water from Pesticides - Herbicide Use in Grassland

Protecting Drinking Water from Pesticides - Advice for Gardeners and Household U

 

Specific information on MCPA

 

MCPA is a herbicide used to control broadleaved weeds in grassland and cereals. Apart from its agricultural use, there are amenity uses (parks, sports grounds, golf courses, roadside verges etc.) and also amateur (home garden) use. There are numerous approved products in Ireland. It is widely used and is highly water-soluble. It would typically be applied in late spring to grassland and spring cereals. There is also autumn use on winter cereals. It can be used on a range of weeds, including ragwort and thistles, and is particularly effective against rushes, which are often a problem on wet pasture land.

 

Emissions of pesticides to water can come from diffuse routes or point sources (e.g. runoff from farmyards). Diffuse routes of entry include spray drift on the day of application, and/or runoff/drainage in the post-application period, especially if heavy rainfall occurs. The substances most likely to be detected in water are high-use substances that are water-soluble and that are relatively persistent in the water column, such as MCPA and mecoprop. Occasional detections of such substances in water following periods of use are not unexpected, especially if runoff occurs from a hard surface adjacent to a water body. Any exceedance of the drinking water parametric value for MCPA or mecoprop should generally be of limited duration as they are not expected to unduly persist in surface water.

 

 

 

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